Here are some Powerful Articles from Popular Media sources Around the World that Say it All...

Love Is All in Your Head - Or Is It in Your Genes? - Laurie Barclay, MD WebMD Health News 

"A 1998 study…documented the sexual activity of 38 young to middle-aged heterosexual men while using pheromones. Users of pheromones, but not of an inactive control substance, had increased frequency of informal dates, affectionate gestures, sleeping next to a romantic partner, foreplay, and sexual intercourse."

Study Finds Proof That Humans React To Pheromones - Melinda Wenner

"Women can smell a man's intentions when a guy is aroused, his sweat activates the female brain…study reveals."

Sexual Orientation: In The Brain Study Finds Brain Differences In Reaction To Testosterone Scent- Christine Lagorio

"They found that gay men differed from heterosexual men and women and from lesbian women, both in terms of which body odors gay men preferred and how their own body odors were regarded by the other groups."

Sexual Pheromones and Sexual Desire

"Imagine an invisible, undetectable force that's powerful enough to override your sense of reason yet draws you to someone with an almost animal passion. These aren't Cupid's mythological arrows, but real shots of human pheromones. Scientists have been researching for years whether or not humans, like other animals, exude these secret scents, with attention focused on a small organ composed of two small pits a few centimeters up the nose."

Male sweat boosts women's hormone levels - Robert Sanders

"Just a few whiffs of a chemical found in male sweat is enough to raise levels of cortisol, a hormone commonly associated with alertness or stress, in heterosexual women, according to a new study by University of California, Berkeley, scientists. The study, reported this week in The Journal of Neuroscience, provides the first direct evidence that humans, like rats, moths and butterflies, secrete a scent that affects the physiology of the opposite sex. "This is the first time anyone has demonstrated that a change in women's hormonal levels is induced by sniffing an identified compound of male sweat," as opposed to applying a chemical to the upper lip, said study leader Claire Wyart, a post-doctoral fellow at UC Berkeley. The team's work was inspired by previous studies by Wyart's colleague Noam Sobel, associate professor of psychology at UC Berkeley and director of the Berkeley Olfactory Research Program. He found that the chemical androstadienone - a compound found in male sweat and an additive in perfumes and colognes - changed mood, sexual arousal, physiological arousal and brain activation in women."

Lesbians Respond Differently to Human Pheromones - National Geographic News May 8, 2006 National Geographic: Roach, John

"Lesbian women respond differently than straight women when exposed to suspected sexual chemicals, according to a new brain imaging study. The finding builds on previous research that suggest that gay men responded in a way more similar to heterosexual women than heterosexual men when exposed to a synthetic chemical. According to the results, lesbians processed neural responses more like heterosexual men than heterosexual women. This lends further support to the idea that the chemicals activate the brain differently from common odors, Savic says."

Sexual Orientation: In the Brain - CBSNews.com, Christine Lagorio, May 9, 2005

"It turns out that sniffing a chemical from testosterone, the male sex hormone, causes a response in the sexual area of gay men's brains, just as it does in the brains of straight women, but not in the brains of straight men. "It is one more piece of evidence... that is showing that sexual orientation is not all learned," said Sandra Witelson, an expert on brain anatomy and sexual orientation at the Michael G. DeGroote School of Medicine at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada. Witelson, who was not part of the research team that conducted the study, said the findings show a biological involvement in sexual orientation."

Secrets of Human Attraction - BBC News: August 29, 2000

"A gene that could explain how humans pick up powerful chemical signals called pheromones may have been pinpointed for the first time. The discovery promises to give scientists a new understanding of our basic instincts. Pheromones are known to trigger physical responses including sexual arousal and defensive behaviour in many species of insects, fish and animals. There has long been speculation that humans may also use these chemicals to communicate instinctive urges. Women living together often synchronise their menstrual cycles because they secrete an odourless chemical in underarm sweat. But until now scientists have not been able to explain how and where in the body the chemicals are picked up and their messages passed to the brain. Many animals, including mice, rabbits and pigs, have a special organ called the vomeronasal organ (VNO). This relays chemical signals directly to the most primitive centres of the brain, stimulating instinctive reactions. In human embryos these organs exist but they appear to perform no function after birth. Now, scientists at Rockefeller University in New York and Yale University in Connecticut believe they have found a gene which may create pheromone receptors. A receptor is an area on a cell that binds to specific molecules. Called V1RL1, the gene resembles no other type of mammalian gene and bears a strong similarity to those thought to create pheromone receptors in rats and mice. "People have taken an anatomical approach to the issue in the past. This is the first attempt to look at the molecular biology," said Dr Peter Mombaerts from Rockefeller University in the journal Nature Genetics."

Pheromones: Potential Participants in Your Sex Life - CNN News: June 25, 1999

"Couples who are having sexual problems could use pheromones combined with traditional therapy to enhance desire. It's also possible, some researchers say, that pheromones could be a mood enhancer, alleviating depression and stress. And the most far-reaching hypothesis so far is that pheromone treatment could control prostate activity in men to reduce the risk of cancer. If you're looking for the man or woman of your dreams, unsuspecting pheromones in your body scent are most likely playing a large and very clever role in mate attraction. According to an article in "Psychology Today," how our body odors are perceived as pleasant and sexy to another person is a highly selective process. We usually smell best to a person whose genetically based immunity to disease differs most from our own. This could benefit you in the long run, making for stronger, healthier children."

Study Finds Proof that Humans React to Pheromones - CNN News: March 11, 1998

"Though any number of animals and insects use pheromones to communicate with each other about important things such as food, territory and sex, the idea that humans might be similarly influenced has been controversial among scientists. But now, researchers at the University of Chicago say they have the first proof that humans produce and react to pheromones. ... One enduring mystery of pheromones is that if they are undetectable by the human sense of smell, how can humans be influenced by them? The answer, some researchers believe, is that pheromones are detected by the same nerve cells in the nose used to detect odor or perhaps by another structure in the nose called the vomeronasal organ."

Pheromones In Male Perspiration Reduce Women's Tension, Alter Hormone Response - Science Daily: March 17, 2003

"Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania and the Monell Chemical Senses Center in Philadelphia have found that exposure to male perspiration has marked psychological and physiological effects on women: It can brighten women's moods, reducing tension and increasing relaxation, and also has a direct effect on the release of luteinizing hormone, which affects the length and timing of the menstrual cycle. In a study led by Preti and colleague Charles J. Wysocki, extracts from the underarms of male volunteers were applied to the upper lip of 18 women ages 25 to 45. During the six hours of exposure to the compound, the women were asked to rate their mood using a fixed scale. "Much to our surprise, the women reported feeling less tense and more relaxed during exposure to the male extract," said Wysocki, a member of the Monell Center and adjunct professor of animal biology in Penn's School of Veterinary Medicine. "This suggests that there may be much more going on in social settings like singles bars than meets the eye."

University of Chicago researchers establish proof of human pheromones

"A University of Chicago researcher has established the first scientific proof for human pheromones, compounds undetectable as odors but which have a major impact on the timing of ovulation."